Previous Page

Crocker Art Museum

216 O St., Sacramento, CA

Phone:
1-(916)-264-5423

Website:
www.crockerartmuseum.org

Get Directions

Featured Event

Wingding: Art Spot

Art Show,Children,Installations

"Wingding" is a festive, three-dimensional art experience designed for young children and their caregivers and/or families. This installation offers opportunities to interact with, and learn about, the basic elements of art through play, experimentation and creative collaboration.

Information:

• Tue 2/20/18 - Wed 2/21/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 2/22/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 2/23/18 - Sun 2/25/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 2/27/18 - Wed 2/28/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 3/1/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 3/2/18 - Sun 3/4/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Other Upcoming Events

E. Charlton Fortune: The Colorful Spirit

Art Show,Museum,Painting

California artist E. Charlton Fortune (1885–1969) came of age during a time when women began to redefine their roles in society, pushing the boundaries of what was expected of them and challenging the status quo. Fortune, unmarried and of independent spirit, often rode her bicycle to find the perfect setting to paint in plein air. The resulting landscapes were not delicate, soft, or feminine but bold and vigorous — and often thought to have been created by a man. Fortune’s paintings have frequently been labeled Impressionist, though moved well beyond the style. Her signature works were strong in color and rugged and gestural in execution. She spent many of her active years working in and around Monterey, where she maintained a home, and then, in the 1920s, lived and painted abroad for extended periods in St. Ives, England, and Saint-Tropez, France. Upon her return to California in the late 1920s, she founded and directed the Monterey Guild, a group of skilled craftspeople who, under her direction, created original, modern artworks and furnishings for churches.

Information:

• Tue 2/20/18 - Wed 2/21/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 2/22/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 2/23/18 - Sun 2/25/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Sun 2/25/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 2/27/18 - Wed 2/28/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

E. Charlton Fortune: The Colorful Spirit

Art Show,Museum,Painting

California artist E. Charlton Fortune (1885–1969) came of age during a time when women began to redefine their roles in society, pushing the boundaries of what was expected of them and challenging the status quo. Fortune, unmarried and of independent spirit, often rode her bicycle to find the perfect setting to paint in plein air. The resulting landscapes were not delicate, soft, or feminine but bold and vigorous — and often thought to have been created by a man. Fortune’s paintings have frequently been labeled Impressionist, though moved well beyond the style. Her signature works were strong in color and rugged and gestural in execution. She spent many of her active years working in and around Monterey, where she maintained a home, and then, in the 1920s, lived and painted abroad for extended periods in St. Ives, England, and Saint-Tropez, France. Upon her return to California in the late 1920s, she founded and directed the Monterey Guild, a group of skilled craftspeople who, under her direction, created original, modern artworks and furnishings for churches.

Information:

• Tue 2/27/18 - Wed 2/28/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 3/1/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Thu 3/1/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 3/2/18 - Sun 3/4/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Kids & Company Gallery Adventure

Art Talk

This amusing and educational tour introduces art to children ages 5 and older (and the adults who tag along with them) in a playful manner.

Information:

• Sun 3/4/18 at 10:30 AM - 11:30 PM

E. Charlton Fortune: The Colorful Spirit

Art Show,Museum,Painting

California artist E. Charlton Fortune (1885–1969) came of age during a time when women began to redefine their roles in society, pushing the boundaries of what was expected of them and challenging the status quo. Fortune, unmarried and of independent spirit, often rode her bicycle to find the perfect setting to paint in plein air. The resulting landscapes were not delicate, soft, or feminine but bold and vigorous — and often thought to have been created by a man. Fortune’s paintings have frequently been labeled Impressionist, though moved well beyond the style. Her signature works were strong in color and rugged and gestural in execution. She spent many of her active years working in and around Monterey, where she maintained a home, and then, in the 1920s, lived and painted abroad for extended periods in St. Ives, England, and Saint-Tropez, France. Upon her return to California in the late 1920s, she founded and directed the Monterey Guild, a group of skilled craftspeople who, under her direction, created original, modern artworks and furnishings for churches.

Information:

• Fri 3/2/18 - Sun 3/4/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 3/6/18 - Wed 3/7/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Tue 3/6/18 - Wed 3/7/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 3/8/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

E. Charlton Fortune: The Colorful Spirit

Art Show,Museum,Painting

California artist E. Charlton Fortune (1885–1969) came of age during a time when women began to redefine their roles in society, pushing the boundaries of what was expected of them and challenging the status quo. Fortune, unmarried and of independent spirit, often rode her bicycle to find the perfect setting to paint in plein air. The resulting landscapes were not delicate, soft, or feminine but bold and vigorous — and often thought to have been created by a man. Fortune’s paintings have frequently been labeled Impressionist, though moved well beyond the style. Her signature works were strong in color and rugged and gestural in execution. She spent many of her active years working in and around Monterey, where she maintained a home, and then, in the 1920s, lived and painted abroad for extended periods in St. Ives, England, and Saint-Tropez, France. Upon her return to California in the late 1920s, she founded and directed the Monterey Guild, a group of skilled craftspeople who, under her direction, created original, modern artworks and furnishings for churches.

Information:

• Thu 3/8/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 3/9/18 - Sun 3/11/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Fri 3/9/18 - Sun 3/11/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Sunday Playday (Drop In)

Children's Arts/Crafts

A monthly program for children ages 4-6 and their caregivers, Sunday Playday is a gallery-based artmaking experience designed to support school readiness. Led by a Museum educator, children will participate in a make-and-take project using a variety of art materials, inspired by a different artwork each month. This program takes place every second Sunday of the month.

Information:

• Sun 3/11/18 at 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Tue 3/13/18 - Wed 3/14/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

E. Charlton Fortune: The Colorful Spirit

Art Show,Museum,Painting

California artist E. Charlton Fortune (1885–1969) came of age during a time when women began to redefine their roles in society, pushing the boundaries of what was expected of them and challenging the status quo. Fortune, unmarried and of independent spirit, often rode her bicycle to find the perfect setting to paint in plein air. The resulting landscapes were not delicate, soft, or feminine but bold and vigorous — and often thought to have been created by a man. Fortune’s paintings have frequently been labeled Impressionist, though moved well beyond the style. Her signature works were strong in color and rugged and gestural in execution. She spent many of her active years working in and around Monterey, where she maintained a home, and then, in the 1920s, lived and painted abroad for extended periods in St. Ives, England, and Saint-Tropez, France. Upon her return to California in the late 1920s, she founded and directed the Monterey Guild, a group of skilled craftspeople who, under her direction, created original, modern artworks and furnishings for churches.

Information:

• Tue 3/13/18 - Wed 3/14/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 3/15/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Thu 3/15/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Kids & Company Gallery Adventure

Art Talk

This amusing and educational tour introduces art to children ages 5 and older (and the adults who tag along with them) in a playful manner.

Information:

• Sun 3/18/18 at 10:30 AM - 11:30 PM

E. Charlton Fortune: The Colorful Spirit

Art Show,Museum,Painting

California artist E. Charlton Fortune (1885–1969) came of age during a time when women began to redefine their roles in society, pushing the boundaries of what was expected of them and challenging the status quo. Fortune, unmarried and of independent spirit, often rode her bicycle to find the perfect setting to paint in plein air. The resulting landscapes were not delicate, soft, or feminine but bold and vigorous — and often thought to have been created by a man. Fortune’s paintings have frequently been labeled Impressionist, though moved well beyond the style. Her signature works were strong in color and rugged and gestural in execution. She spent many of her active years working in and around Monterey, where she maintained a home, and then, in the 1920s, lived and painted abroad for extended periods in St. Ives, England, and Saint-Tropez, France. Upon her return to California in the late 1920s, she founded and directed the Monterey Guild, a group of skilled craftspeople who, under her direction, created original, modern artworks and furnishings for churches.

Information:

• Fri 3/16/18 - Sun 3/18/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Fri 3/16/18 - Sun 3/18/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

E. Charlton Fortune: The Colorful Spirit

Art Show,Museum,Painting

California artist E. Charlton Fortune (1885–1969) came of age during a time when women began to redefine their roles in society, pushing the boundaries of what was expected of them and challenging the status quo. Fortune, unmarried and of independent spirit, often rode her bicycle to find the perfect setting to paint in plein air. The resulting landscapes were not delicate, soft, or feminine but bold and vigorous — and often thought to have been created by a man. Fortune’s paintings have frequently been labeled Impressionist, though moved well beyond the style. Her signature works were strong in color and rugged and gestural in execution. She spent many of her active years working in and around Monterey, where she maintained a home, and then, in the 1920s, lived and painted abroad for extended periods in St. Ives, England, and Saint-Tropez, France. Upon her return to California in the late 1920s, she founded and directed the Monterey Guild, a group of skilled craftspeople who, under her direction, created original, modern artworks and furnishings for churches.

Information:

• Tue 3/20/18 - Wed 3/21/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Tue 3/20/18 - Wed 3/21/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 3/22/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

E. Charlton Fortune: The Colorful Spirit

Art Show,Museum,Painting

California artist E. Charlton Fortune (1885–1969) came of age during a time when women began to redefine their roles in society, pushing the boundaries of what was expected of them and challenging the status quo. Fortune, unmarried and of independent spirit, often rode her bicycle to find the perfect setting to paint in plein air. The resulting landscapes were not delicate, soft, or feminine but bold and vigorous — and often thought to have been created by a man. Fortune’s paintings have frequently been labeled Impressionist, though moved well beyond the style. Her signature works were strong in color and rugged and gestural in execution. She spent many of her active years working in and around Monterey, where she maintained a home, and then, in the 1920s, lived and painted abroad for extended periods in St. Ives, England, and Saint-Tropez, France. Upon her return to California in the late 1920s, she founded and directed the Monterey Guild, a group of skilled craftspeople who, under her direction, created original, modern artworks and furnishings for churches.

Information:

• Thu 3/22/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 3/23/18 - Sun 3/25/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Fri 3/23/18 - Sun 3/25/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Sun 3/25/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 3/27/18 - Wed 3/28/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Tue 3/27/18 - Wed 3/28/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

E. Charlton Fortune: The Colorful Spirit

Art Show,Museum,Painting

California artist E. Charlton Fortune (1885–1969) came of age during a time when women began to redefine their roles in society, pushing the boundaries of what was expected of them and challenging the status quo. Fortune, unmarried and of independent spirit, often rode her bicycle to find the perfect setting to paint in plein air. The resulting landscapes were not delicate, soft, or feminine but bold and vigorous — and often thought to have been created by a man. Fortune’s paintings have frequently been labeled Impressionist, though moved well beyond the style. Her signature works were strong in color and rugged and gestural in execution. She spent many of her active years working in and around Monterey, where she maintained a home, and then, in the 1920s, lived and painted abroad for extended periods in St. Ives, England, and Saint-Tropez, France. Upon her return to California in the late 1920s, she founded and directed the Monterey Guild, a group of skilled craftspeople who, under her direction, created original, modern artworks and furnishings for churches.

Information:

• Tue 3/27/18 - Wed 3/28/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 3/29/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Thu 3/29/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Thu 3/29/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 3/30/18 - Sun 4/1/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Kids & Company Gallery Adventure

Art Talk

This amusing and educational tour introduces art to children ages 5 and older (and the adults who tag along with them) in a playful manner.

Information:

• Sun 4/1/18 at 10:30 AM - 11:30 PM

E. Charlton Fortune: The Colorful Spirit

Art Show,Museum,Painting

California artist E. Charlton Fortune (1885–1969) came of age during a time when women began to redefine their roles in society, pushing the boundaries of what was expected of them and challenging the status quo. Fortune, unmarried and of independent spirit, often rode her bicycle to find the perfect setting to paint in plein air. The resulting landscapes were not delicate, soft, or feminine but bold and vigorous — and often thought to have been created by a man. Fortune’s paintings have frequently been labeled Impressionist, though moved well beyond the style. Her signature works were strong in color and rugged and gestural in execution. She spent many of her active years working in and around Monterey, where she maintained a home, and then, in the 1920s, lived and painted abroad for extended periods in St. Ives, England, and Saint-Tropez, France. Upon her return to California in the late 1920s, she founded and directed the Monterey Guild, a group of skilled craftspeople who, under her direction, created original, modern artworks and furnishings for churches.

Information:

• Fri 3/30/18 - Sun 4/1/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Fri 3/30/18 - Sun 4/1/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

E. Charlton Fortune: The Colorful Spirit

Art Show,Museum,Painting

California artist E. Charlton Fortune (1885–1969) came of age during a time when women began to redefine their roles in society, pushing the boundaries of what was expected of them and challenging the status quo. Fortune, unmarried and of independent spirit, often rode her bicycle to find the perfect setting to paint in plein air. The resulting landscapes were not delicate, soft, or feminine but bold and vigorous — and often thought to have been created by a man. Fortune’s paintings have frequently been labeled Impressionist, though moved well beyond the style. Her signature works were strong in color and rugged and gestural in execution. She spent many of her active years working in and around Monterey, where she maintained a home, and then, in the 1920s, lived and painted abroad for extended periods in St. Ives, England, and Saint-Tropez, France. Upon her return to California in the late 1920s, she founded and directed the Monterey Guild, a group of skilled craftspeople who, under her direction, created original, modern artworks and furnishings for churches.

Information:

• Tue 4/3/18 - Wed 4/4/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Tue 4/3/18 - Wed 4/4/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Tue 4/3/18 - Wed 4/4/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 4/5/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Thu 4/5/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

E. Charlton Fortune: The Colorful Spirit

Art Show,Museum,Painting

California artist E. Charlton Fortune (1885–1969) came of age during a time when women began to redefine their roles in society, pushing the boundaries of what was expected of them and challenging the status quo. Fortune, unmarried and of independent spirit, often rode her bicycle to find the perfect setting to paint in plein air. The resulting landscapes were not delicate, soft, or feminine but bold and vigorous — and often thought to have been created by a man. Fortune’s paintings have frequently been labeled Impressionist, though moved well beyond the style. Her signature works were strong in color and rugged and gestural in execution. She spent many of her active years working in and around Monterey, where she maintained a home, and then, in the 1920s, lived and painted abroad for extended periods in St. Ives, England, and Saint-Tropez, France. Upon her return to California in the late 1920s, she founded and directed the Monterey Guild, a group of skilled craftspeople who, under her direction, created original, modern artworks and furnishings for churches.

Information:

• Thu 4/5/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 4/6/18 - Sun 4/8/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Fri 4/6/18 - Sun 4/8/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Fri 4/6/18 - Sun 4/8/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Sunday Playday (Drop In)

Children's Arts/Crafts

A monthly program for children ages 4-6 and their caregivers, Sunday Playday is a gallery-based artmaking experience designed to support school readiness. Led by a Museum educator, children will participate in a make-and-take project using a variety of art materials, inspired by a different artwork each month. This program takes place every second Sunday of the month.

Information:

• Sun 4/8/18 at 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Tue 4/10/18 - Wed 4/11/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Tue 4/10/18 - Wed 4/11/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

E. Charlton Fortune: The Colorful Spirit

Art Show,Museum,Painting

California artist E. Charlton Fortune (1885–1969) came of age during a time when women began to redefine their roles in society, pushing the boundaries of what was expected of them and challenging the status quo. Fortune, unmarried and of independent spirit, often rode her bicycle to find the perfect setting to paint in plein air. The resulting landscapes were not delicate, soft, or feminine but bold and vigorous — and often thought to have been created by a man. Fortune’s paintings have frequently been labeled Impressionist, though moved well beyond the style. Her signature works were strong in color and rugged and gestural in execution. She spent many of her active years working in and around Monterey, where she maintained a home, and then, in the 1920s, lived and painted abroad for extended periods in St. Ives, England, and Saint-Tropez, France. Upon her return to California in the late 1920s, she founded and directed the Monterey Guild, a group of skilled craftspeople who, under her direction, created original, modern artworks and furnishings for churches.

Information:

• Tue 4/10/18 - Wed 4/11/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 4/12/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Thu 4/12/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Thu 4/12/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Fri 4/13/18 - Sun 4/15/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Kids & Company Gallery Adventure

Art Talk

This amusing and educational tour introduces art to children ages 5 and older (and the adults who tag along with them) in a playful manner.

Information:

• Sun 4/15/18 at 10:30 AM - 11:30 PM

E. Charlton Fortune: The Colorful Spirit

Art Show,Museum,Painting

California artist E. Charlton Fortune (1885–1969) came of age during a time when women began to redefine their roles in society, pushing the boundaries of what was expected of them and challenging the status quo. Fortune, unmarried and of independent spirit, often rode her bicycle to find the perfect setting to paint in plein air. The resulting landscapes were not delicate, soft, or feminine but bold and vigorous — and often thought to have been created by a man. Fortune’s paintings have frequently been labeled Impressionist, though moved well beyond the style. Her signature works were strong in color and rugged and gestural in execution. She spent many of her active years working in and around Monterey, where she maintained a home, and then, in the 1920s, lived and painted abroad for extended periods in St. Ives, England, and Saint-Tropez, France. Upon her return to California in the late 1920s, she founded and directed the Monterey Guild, a group of skilled craftspeople who, under her direction, created original, modern artworks and furnishings for churches.

Information:

• Fri 4/13/18 - Sun 4/15/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Fri 4/13/18 - Sun 4/15/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

E. Charlton Fortune: The Colorful Spirit

Art Show,Museum,Painting

California artist E. Charlton Fortune (1885–1969) came of age during a time when women began to redefine their roles in society, pushing the boundaries of what was expected of them and challenging the status quo. Fortune, unmarried and of independent spirit, often rode her bicycle to find the perfect setting to paint in plein air. The resulting landscapes were not delicate, soft, or feminine but bold and vigorous — and often thought to have been created by a man. Fortune’s paintings have frequently been labeled Impressionist, though moved well beyond the style. Her signature works were strong in color and rugged and gestural in execution. She spent many of her active years working in and around Monterey, where she maintained a home, and then, in the 1920s, lived and painted abroad for extended periods in St. Ives, England, and Saint-Tropez, France. Upon her return to California in the late 1920s, she founded and directed the Monterey Guild, a group of skilled craftspeople who, under her direction, created original, modern artworks and furnishings for churches.

Information:

• Tue 4/17/18 - Wed 4/18/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Tue 4/17/18 - Wed 4/18/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Tue 4/17/18 - Wed 4/18/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 4/19/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Thu 4/19/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

E. Charlton Fortune: The Colorful Spirit

Art Show,Museum,Painting

California artist E. Charlton Fortune (1885–1969) came of age during a time when women began to redefine their roles in society, pushing the boundaries of what was expected of them and challenging the status quo. Fortune, unmarried and of independent spirit, often rode her bicycle to find the perfect setting to paint in plein air. The resulting landscapes were not delicate, soft, or feminine but bold and vigorous — and often thought to have been created by a man. Fortune’s paintings have frequently been labeled Impressionist, though moved well beyond the style. Her signature works were strong in color and rugged and gestural in execution. She spent many of her active years working in and around Monterey, where she maintained a home, and then, in the 1920s, lived and painted abroad for extended periods in St. Ives, England, and Saint-Tropez, France. Upon her return to California in the late 1920s, she founded and directed the Monterey Guild, a group of skilled craftspeople who, under her direction, created original, modern artworks and furnishings for churches.

Information:

• Thu 4/19/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 4/20/18 - Sun 4/22/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Fri 4/20/18 - Sun 4/22/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Fri 4/20/18 - Sun 4/22/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Tue 4/24/18 - Wed 4/25/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Tue 4/24/18 - Wed 4/25/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 4/26/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Thu 4/26/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Fri 4/27/18 - Sun 4/29/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Fri 4/27/18 - Sun 4/29/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 5/1/18 - Wed 5/2/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Tue 5/1/18 - Wed 5/2/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 5/3/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Thu 5/3/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Fri 5/4/18 - Sun 5/6/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Kids & Company Gallery Adventure

Art Talk

This amusing and educational tour introduces art to children ages 5 and older (and the adults who tag along with them) in a playful manner.

Information:

• Sun 5/6/18 at 10:30 AM - 11:30 PM

Crocker Architecture Tour

Art Talk

Explore the distinct architectural elements, inside and out, of the Teel Family Pavilion and the historic building. The tour runs from May-December on the first Sunday of each month.

Information:

• Sun 5/6/18 at - 1:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Fri 5/4/18 - Sun 5/6/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 5/8/18 - Wed 5/9/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Tue 5/8/18 - Wed 5/9/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 5/10/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Thu 5/10/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Fri 5/11/18 - Sun 5/13/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Sun 5/13/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Sunday Playday (Drop In)

Children's Arts/Crafts

A monthly program for children ages 4-6 and their caregivers, Sunday Playday is a gallery-based artmaking experience designed to support school readiness. Led by a Museum educator, children will participate in a make-and-take project using a variety of art materials, inspired by a different artwork each month. This program takes place every second Sunday of the month.

Information:

• Sun 5/13/18 at 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Power Up: Corita Kent's Heavenly Art

Art Show,Prints,Museum

Nun, printmaker, and activist Corita Kent developed and used a striking Pop sensibility in her religious art. Drawing on the visual language of advertising and the daily world, her screenprints combine images and words to create bold messages of joy. Leading the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, Kent became part of an enthusiastic community of socially engaged artists who revolutionized campus life. Her adventurous approach in art and life unsettled many, including the Church hierarchy; she left holy orders in 1968 and moved to Boston, where she continued her pursuit of social justice through art until her death in 1985. The nearly 30 prints in this exhibition chronicle her most productive periods, including the mid-1960s, when her forceful imagery and message — and her unexpected calling as a nun — led to her greatest popularity.

Information:

• Fri 5/11/18 - Sun 5/13/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Tue 5/15/18 - Wed 5/16/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Tue 5/15/18 - Wed 5/16/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 5/17/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Thu 5/17/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Kids & Company Gallery Adventure

Art Talk

This amusing and educational tour introduces art to children ages 5 and older (and the adults who tag along with them) in a playful manner.

Information:

• Sun 5/20/18 at 10:30 AM - 11:30 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Fri 5/18/18 - Sun 5/20/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Fri 5/18/18 - Sun 5/20/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 5/22/18 - Wed 5/23/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Tue 5/22/18 - Wed 5/23/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 5/24/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Thu 5/24/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Fri 5/25/18 - Sun 5/27/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Fri 5/25/18 - Sun 5/27/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 5/29/18 - Wed 5/30/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Tue 5/29/18 - Wed 5/30/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 5/31/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Thu 5/31/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Fri 6/1/18 - Sun 6/3/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Fri 6/1/18 - Sun 6/3/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Kids & Company Gallery Adventure

Art Talk

This amusing and educational tour introduces art to children ages 5 and older (and the adults who tag along with them) in a playful manner.

Information:

• Sun 6/3/18 at 10:30 AM - 11:30 PM

Crocker Architecture Tour

Art Talk

Explore the distinct architectural elements, inside and out, of the Teel Family Pavilion and the historic building. The tour runs from May-December on the first Sunday of each month.

Information:

• Sun 6/3/18 at - 1:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Tue 6/5/18 - Wed 6/6/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Tue 6/5/18 - Wed 6/6/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 6/7/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Thu 6/7/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Sunday Playday (Drop In)

Children's Arts/Crafts

A monthly program for children ages 4-6 and their caregivers, Sunday Playday is a gallery-based artmaking experience designed to support school readiness. Led by a Museum educator, children will participate in a make-and-take project using a variety of art materials, inspired by a different artwork each month. This program takes place every second Sunday of the month.

Information:

• Sun 6/10/18 at 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Fri 6/8/18 - Sun 6/10/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Fri 6/8/18 - Sun 6/10/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 6/12/18 - Wed 6/13/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Tue 6/12/18 - Wed 6/13/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 6/14/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Thu 6/14/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Fri 6/15/18 - Sun 6/17/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Fri 6/15/18 - Sun 6/17/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Kids & Company Gallery Adventure

Art Talk

This amusing and educational tour introduces art to children ages 5 and older (and the adults who tag along with them) in a playful manner.

Information:

• Sun 6/17/18 at 10:30 AM - 11:30 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Tue 6/19/18 - Wed 6/20/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Tue 6/19/18 - Wed 6/20/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 6/21/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Thu 6/21/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Sun 6/24/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Fri 6/22/18 - Sun 6/24/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Fri 6/22/18 - Sun 6/24/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 6/26/18 - Wed 6/27/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Tue 6/26/18 - Wed 6/27/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Tue 6/26/18 - Wed 6/27/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 6/28/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Thu 6/28/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Thu 6/28/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Fri 6/29/18 - Sun 7/1/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Fri 6/29/18 - Sun 7/1/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Fri 6/29/18 - Sun 7/1/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Crocker Architecture Tour

Art Talk

Explore the distinct architectural elements, inside and out, of the Teel Family Pavilion and the historic building. The tour runs from May-December on the first Sunday of each month.

Information:

• Sun 7/1/18 at - 1:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Tue 7/3/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Tue 7/3/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Tue 7/3/18 - Wed 7/4/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 7/5/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Thu 7/5/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Thu 7/5/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 7/6/18 - Sun 7/8/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Fri 7/6/18 - Sun 7/8/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Fri 7/6/18 - Sun 7/8/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Tue 7/10/18 - Wed 7/11/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Tue 7/10/18 - Wed 7/11/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Tue 7/10/18 - Wed 7/11/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 7/12/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Thu 7/12/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Thu 7/12/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Fri 7/13/18 - Sun 7/15/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Cyrus Tilton: The Cycle

Art Show,Museum,Sculpture,Installations

Cyrus Tilton (1977–2017) grew up in a remote river valley northeast of Anchorage, AK, where vast expanses of open wilderness were always close at hand. After moving to the urban environment of Oakland at 21, he grew concerned with the world’s burgeoning human population, the earth’s inability to sustain such continued growth and the current trend of mass consumerism. In "The Cycle," the locust serves a cautionary metaphor, and Tilton likens the insect to self-sabotaging consumers whose ultimate end will come once their resources are depleted or a massive natural disaster resets the cycle. Tilton, who died of cancer at 39 in March 2017, received the inaugural John S. Knudsen Prize from the Crocker Art Museum in 2017. The prize supports an emerging or mid-career California artist while also funding programs, exhibitions, acquisitions, and other endeavors related to the artist’s work at the Museum.

Information:

• Fri 7/13/18 - Sun 7/15/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Fri 7/13/18 - Sun 7/15/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Tue 7/17/18 - Wed 7/18/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Tue 7/17/18 - Wed 7/18/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Thu 7/19/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Thu 7/19/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 7/20/18 - Sun 7/22/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Fri 7/20/18 - Sun 7/22/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 7/24/18 - Wed 7/25/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Tue 7/24/18 - Wed 7/25/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Thu 7/26/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Thu 7/26/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 7/27/18 - Sun 7/29/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Fri 7/27/18 - Sun 7/29/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 7/31/18 - Wed 8/1/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Tue 7/31/18 - Wed 8/1/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Thu 8/2/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Thu 8/2/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 8/3/18 - Sun 8/5/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Crocker Architecture Tour

Art Talk

Explore the distinct architectural elements, inside and out, of the Teel Family Pavilion and the historic building. The tour runs from May-December on the first Sunday of each month.

Information:

• Sun 8/5/18 at - 1:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Fri 8/3/18 - Sun 8/5/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Tue 8/7/18 - Wed 8/8/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Tue 8/7/18 - Wed 8/8/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 8/9/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Thu 8/9/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 8/10/18 - Sun 8/12/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Fri 8/10/18 - Sun 8/12/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 8/14/18 - Wed 8/15/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Tue 8/14/18 - Wed 8/15/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Thu 8/16/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Thu 8/16/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 8/17/18 - Sun 8/19/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment

Art Show,Museum,Painting,Drawings/Works on Paper,Sculpture

"Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from the Horvitz Collection" examines the many paths and stages of women's lives in the art of 18th-century France. Works by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau, Greuze and others, all drawn from the finest private collection of French art in the United States, show a variety of women, from court ladies to washerwomen, in their many societal roles. From the ancien régime to the Revolution and beyond, women's position and power were transformed. Organized thematically, the exhibition's 100-plus paintings, drawings and sculptures explore cultural and literary archetypes that affected women's self-image, their development from childhood to old age, their romances and their familial responsibilities. In addition to a new understanding of French 18th-century art, "Becoming a Woman" provides a new view of the feminine world at the dawn of modernity.

Information:

• Fri 8/17/18 - Sun 8/19/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Tue 8/21/18 - Wed 8/22/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 8/23/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 8/24/18 - Sun 8/26/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 8/28/18 - Wed 8/29/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 8/30/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 8/31/18 - Sun 9/2/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Crocker Architecture Tour

Art Talk

Explore the distinct architectural elements, inside and out, of the Teel Family Pavilion and the historic building. The tour runs from May-December on the first Sunday of each month.

Information:

• Sun 9/2/18 at - 1:00 PM

Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo

Art Show,Museum,Painting

Eduardo Carrillo's artwork has been described as mystical, realistic, surreal and visionary. His imagery, whether grounded in the everyday world or infused with magical realism, reflects his relationship to his native California and to his Mexican heritage, as well as to his early religious upbringing and respect for European traditions in art. An inspirational leader who actively challenged racism and injustice, Carrillo created programs and platforms that promoted greater awareness of Latin American culture, aesthetics and social concerns, significantly advancing the recognition and appreciation of Chicano art and culture in California. "Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo" highlights the creative efforts and social importance of Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private and the museum. The artist's murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Intimate watercolors and paintings describe the artist's everyday life in self-portraits, still-lifes, and images of people and places he held dear. Large-scale visionary paintings - Carrillo's masterpieces - reveal his complex and creative mind. The exhibition also includes the bilingual video "Eduardo Carrillo: A Life of Engagement" by Pedro Pablo Celedón.

Information:

• Tue 9/4/18 - Wed 9/5/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 9/6/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 9/7/18 - Sun 9/9/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 9/11/18 - Wed 9/12/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 9/13/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 9/14/18 - Sun 9/16/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 9/18/18 - Wed 9/19/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 9/20/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 9/21/18 - Sun 9/23/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 9/25/18 - Wed 9/26/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 9/27/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 9/28/18 - Sun 9/30/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Tue 10/2/18 - Wed 10/3/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
• Thu 10/4/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 10/5/18 - Sun 10/7/18 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Crocker Architecture Tour

Art Talk

Explore the distinct architectural elements, inside and out, of the Teel Family Pavilion and the historic building. The tour runs from May-December on the first Sunday of each month.

Information:

• Sun 10/7/18 at - 1:00 PM
• Sun 11/4/18 at - 1:00 PM
• Sun 12/2/18 at - 1:00 PM